Thursday, June 11, 2015

Little Octopus: An East Nashville Restaurant That Raises the Bar

I was lucky enough to be able to try the new Little Octopus restaurant in East Nashville during their soft opening for lunch last Saturday. While I keep my ear to the ground about restaurants, this one hadn't blipped my radar very strongly. I was aware of the backstory -- Nashville food entrepreneur Sarah Gavigan was moving her popular Otaku ramen enterprise to The Gulch, and the POP Nashville space that had housed Otaku was to be home to a new restaurant. Other than that, I knew nothing.

The only picture I took, because I wasn't planning on blogging

That is ... Until my Twitter blew up one night last week, with local chefs praising the meal they were currently eating at Little Octopus. The next day, my blogger compatriots started chiming in, and ... I had to go. It turns out that after the chefs' night, the soft opening was open to the public. Frequent dining companion Melissa and I quickly made plans to go.

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Butternut Squash and Goat Cheese Empanadas

I stumbled across a recipe for butternut squash "hand pies" a while back, and with a few tweaks it turned out to be nice choice for a potluck this past weekend. Contributing a dish to the annual Nashville Food Blogger party is a bit nerve-wracking, given that our group includes food and food writing professionals as well as extremely talented amateurs. I was very pleased with how they turned out.


I detest the term "hand pie" so I call them empanadas, given the Latin American-inspired flavors. The combination of butternut squash, goat cheese, and the seasonings work well together. The crowning glory of the empanadas is the crust; this is a standard all-butter pie crust, which I discussed in this previous post.

The directions here are for creating mini empanadas; the perfect size to provide a few bites as a snack or appetizer. You can, of course, make a larger size for a more substantial treat.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

How to Make a Perfect, Easy Pie Crust

OK, "perfect, easy pie crust" is a lie; really, what I'm trying to say is that pie crust is not as difficult as you may fear, and that perfection is overrated. I get it, I've been there. I did not grow up with much homemade pie crust, even though my mother was a great baker. Like everyone else we knew, we used frozen shells most of the time. Like a lot of things I now make from scratch, I didn't start experimenting with pie crust until I was in my 20's. Even then, I wasn't happy with the results. I felt like a failure and stuck with frozen or refrigerated pie shells from the grocery store.

As I've continued to branch out with cooking and baking, I've revisited pie crust every now and then. I've tried Cook's Illustrated method that uses vodka and a combination of butter and shortening. I've reviewed (but never made) Alton Brown's various crusts. I've used Ruth Levy Beranbaum's exacting method which includes baking powder, vinegar, and precisely-sized cuts of carefully timed, partially-frozen butter. Making the recipe from Beranbaum, who I generally like and trust, feels like amateur brain surgery, and in the end, I just didn't like the crust that much.

A good pie crust shouldn't be brain surgery

I wouldn't discourage you from trying any and all methods to find your best pie crust, and Mr. Google can help you find the above and more. For me, though, I figured out that keeping it simple was the key to getting me to stay away from the freezer case and and the long red boxes in favor of superior taste and quality.